Cheap Chinese 2 meter and 70 cm handhelds

On this page, I've included links to a number of inexpensive Chinese 2 meter and 70 cm handhelds.

The products listed on this page are suitable only for use by licensed amateur radio operators. Most of them can transmit inside the ham band or outside of the band. If you don't have an amateur license, then this product will cause you nothing but grief. If you use it inside the ham band, you will discover that hams are extremely protective of their frequencies, and they will track you down. You will stick out like a sore thumb, and you will not go unnoticed.

I originally posted this page a few years ago. At the time, a few cheap handhelds were showing up on eBay and other places which could be shipped straight from China. Some of those are still available. Generally, you could legally buy those radios for your own personal use. And if you were a licensed ham, you could legally use them in the U.S. (or other countries with similar regulations), as long as you understood that you were responsible for the correct operation. In other words, if they were putting out a spurious signal somewhere, you were on your own.

In general, however, these Chinese radios could not be imported or resold in the U.S. This was because they were never certified by the FCC. In general, most of these radios need certification (under either Part 15 or Part 90 of the FCC rules) before they can be imported and resold. Again, importing one for your personal use was an exception, so it was possible to legally buy these radios from China. Depending on how you read the rules, it could be argued that they were illegal to sell, even if you decided to sell them used many years later. But buying one from China was and is legal.

Since I originally posted this page, more and more of these radios have shown up for sale in the United States. And more importantly, some (but not all) of them are certified under either Part 15 and/or Part 90. This means that U.S. retailers can legally sell them in the U.S.

If you are thinking of buying one of these, it's probably a good idea to look for the FCC certification. First of all, if a U.S. seller is selling uncertified radios, this is illegal. It's not illegal for you to buy the radio--it's just illegal for the seller to sell it. But more importantly, it does increase the risk that you will use it in violation of the rules. Such a radio might work fine right out of the box. But there's always a chance that it is transmitting a spurious signal outside the ham bands. So there's always the chance that your putting out a spurious signal which interferes with someone else (like your local police department). Unless you test the radio yourself, you'll have no idea that this is happening. But you could very well get people mad at you, in which case they will eventually track you down, and you'll face the possibility of a huge fine (generally in the ballpark of $10,000 per day).

If the manufacturer went to the trouble of having the radio certified, the chances of this happening are greatly reduced. Again, the uncertified radio will probably function flawlessly. But if you have a choice between a certified model and an uncertified one, it's probably best to get the certified one.

Most of these radios now for sale are available on Amazon, which is probably a good place to buy. All or most of these radios are actually being sold by third-party sellers, and the third-party seller is the one who actually ships the radio. But you actually make the purchase through Amazon, and if there are any problems with the sale, you will have Amazon's customer service to back you up.

Here are some of the radios that are currently listed on Amazon. Most of these have free shipping available. If you're looking for "name brand" ham gear on Amazon, I have that listed on another page.

Baofeng/Pofung

Baofeng has recently changed its name to Pofung. Therefore, on some of the listings below, you'll see the names used more or less interchangeably.

For a review of the Baofeng UV-5R, please visit my blog: http://onetuberadio.com/category/baofeng-uv-5r/

If you have or are going to buy a UV-5R, My blog contains a discussion of accessories you might want. You don't need to buy anything additional, but that page explains some additions that might be helpful. One accessory that is almost essential, however, is the programming cable, and you should probably order it when you get the radio:

You can download the free Chirp software at this link. While not absolutely necessary, the cable and software are very useful for programming radios such as the UV-3R and UV-5R. And it's really necessary for radios such as the BF-888, which don't have any other way of changing frequency, other than programming them with a computer.


TYT


The TYT rigs covering 222 MHz can be found on my 222 MHz page.

Puxing


WouXun


Unknown Brand


Other Sellers


Here are links to these same and similar radios at other sellers. Some of these ship directly from China:

I really don't have any information about the following radios, other than they appear to be available from Yilutong Technology Co.Ltd. Some of them appear to be knockoffs of radios from the big 3, complete with identical model numbers. Let me know if you have any feedback about any of the following radios.

New Design GYQ-3000S VHF/ UHF Professional FM Handheld Transceiver Walkie Talkie in High Quality with 39 CTCSS and 83 DCS - $39.97

New Design GYQ-3000S VHF/ UHF Professional FM Handheld Transceiver Walkie Talkie in High Quality with 39 CTCSS and 83 DCS


New Design HLT-6300 VHF/ UHF Professional FM Handheld Transceiver Walkie Talkie in High Quality with 50 CTCSS and 83 DCS - $53.70

New Design HLT-6300 VHF/ UHF Professional FM Handheld Transceiver Walkie Talkie in High Quality with 50 CTCSS and 83 DCS


New Design HLT-6100 VHF/ UHF Professional FM Handheld Transceiver Walkie Talkie in High Quality with 39 CTCSS and 83 DCS - $33.39

New Design HLT-6100 VHF/ UHF Professional FM Handheld Transceiver Walkie Talkie in High Quality with 39 CTCSS and 83 DCS


New Design HLT-5100 VHF/ UHF Professional FM Handheld Transceiver Walkie Talkie in High Quality with 39 CTCSS and 83 DCS - $33.26

New Design HLT-5100 VHF/ UHF Professional FM Handheld Transceiver Walkie Talkie in High Quality with 39 CTCSS and 83 DCS


UV-5R Professional VHF/ UHF FM Transceiver Walkie Talkie with Dual Band/ Dual Display/ Dual Standby (Black) - $55.73

UV-5R Professional VHF/ UHF FM Transceiver Walkie Talkie with Dual Band/ Dual Display/ Dual Standby (Black)


And here are some more from "dx.com", which apparently stands for "Deal Extreme" and only coincidentally involves radios:

Dual Frequency Display Multi Band Walkie-Talkie with VOX/Flashlight/FM Radio (VHF/UHF) - $87.40

Model: TG-UV2 - Double frequency display of the 1.3" LCD - Talk in multi-bands. Features U-U, V-V, U-V work mode - CTCSS/DCS auto search - Built-in VOX function and FM radio - Frequency range: FM: 88-108MHz (RX); VHF: 136-174MHz (RX/TX); UHF1: 350-390MHz (RX/TX); UHF2: 400-470MHz (RX/TX); UHF3: 470-520MHz (RX) - PC programmable - 1750Hz call tone - 200 channels storage - Channel scanning list edition (by which you may choose a channel to scan) - Transmitter: Power output: High equal or greater than 5w; Medium equal or greater than 2.5w;? Low equal or greater than 1w - Receiver: RF Sensitivity: -122dBm (12dB SINAD) - Built-in 1 LED bright white light flashlight - With earphone/microphone jacks - Powered by 2000mAh rechargeable battery - Package included: - 1 * Walkie-talkie with 2000mAh battery - 1 * AC 110V charger (US plug) - 1 * Charger dock - 1 * Antenna - 1 * Belt clip - 1 * Hand strap - 1 * English/Chinese user manual


BF-V85 Rechargeable VHF / UHF 99-Channel Two-way Radio Walkie Talkies with FM - Black - $44.99

Color: Black - Material: Plastic housing - Model: BF-V85 - 1.2" LCD display - Frequency range: VHF:136-174MHz, UHF:400-470MHz, FM:65~108MHz - RF power: 4W / 1W (adjustable) - Channel number: 99 - Working voltage: 7.4V - Working range: 1000~4000m - Encryption: CTCSS, DCS - Battery capacity: 1500mAh - Standby time: 72 hours - Working time: 24 hours - Functions: Dual band, dual watch, single display; LCD menu operations; Emergency alarm; Priority channel scan; FM radio (65~108MHz); 1750Hz relay forwarding confirmed - Packing list: - 1 x Two-way radio - 1 x Battery - 1 x 100~240V power adapter (2-flat-pin plug / 90cm-cable) - 1 x Antenna - 1 x Earphone (90cm-cable) - 1 x Belt clip - 1 x Strap - 1 x English manual - 1 x EU plug adapter - 1 x 11V charging dock


BAOFENG 5W UHF / VHF Dual Band 128-CH Walkie Talkie w/ FM Radio - Black - $59.20

Brand: BAOFENG; Model: UV-6; Color: Black; Material: Plastic housing; Quantity: 1; Frequency Range: UHF: 400-480MHz, VHF: 136-174 MHz; FM frequency: 65-108MHz; Power: 5W/1W (switchable) W; Channel: 128; Working Voltage: DC 7.4 V; Working Distance: Approx 3000~5000 m; Encryption: CTCSS, DCSS; Battery Capacity: 2000 mAh; Standby Time: 72 hour; Working Time: 24 hour; Features: With FM radio; Packing List: 1 x Walkie talkie; 1 x Battery; 1 x Antenna; 1 x 100~240V power adapter (US plug/90cm-cable); 1 x EU plug power adapter; 1 x 14.5V charging docking station; 1 x Earphone (90cm); 1 x Clip; 1 x Strap; 1 x Chinese user manual;


BERIK MP-668 1.0" LCD VHF / UHF 5W 199-Channel 136~174MHz / 400~470MHz Walkie Talkie w/ FM Radio - $69.60

Brand: BERIK; Model: MP-668; Color: Black; Material: PC + ABS; Quantity: 1; Frequency Range: 136~174MHz / 400~470MHz; Channel: 199; Frequency Stability: 5 ppm; Output Power: 5 W; Working Voltage: 7.4 V; Working Distance: 5000 m; Encryption: CTCSS / DCS; Battery Capacity: 150 mAh; Features: 1" LCD; FM radio / alarm, compatible with lithium battery and hydrogen battery; Chinese / English voice prompt, humanized design; Power save, voice control, CTCSS/CDCSS, VOX function; 38 Groups CTCSS and 105 Groups DCS; DTMF diphonia multiple-frequency signal function; PC program function; Packing List: 1 x Walkie talkie; 1 x Battery; 1 x Antenna; 1 x Belt clip; 1 x Strap (20cm); 1 x Dock charger (220V); 1 x AC power charger (220V / 105cm-cable / EU plug); 2 x Screws; 1 x Chinese user manual;


Talkpod TP-505 1.5" LCD Dual Frequency Multi Band Walkie-Talkie with VOX / Flashlight / (VHF / UHF) - $61.80

Brand: Talkpod; Model: TP-505; Color: Black; Material: ABS; Quantity: 1; Frequency Range: VHF: 136-174MHz (RX/TX); UHF: 400-470MHz (RX/TX); Channel: 128; Frequency Stability: +-2.5 ppm; Output Power: 1~5 W; Working Voltage: 7.4 V; Working Distance: 5000~8000 m; Battery Capacity: 2000mAh mAh; Standby Time: 100 hour; Working Time: 14 hour; Features: Double frequency; Other: 1.5" LCD screen; Packing List: 1 x Walkie-talkie1 x Chinese manual1 x English manual1 x US plug charger (220V 106cm)1 x Strap (21cm)1 x Antenna1 x 12V station1 x Back case;

Mobile Rigs


The following mobile rigs are also available on Amazon:

In most cases, the seller should state in the description whether the particular radio is certified under Part 15 or Part 90. In some cases, however, the seller might be unaware of the importance of this information. In that case, you might need to do some research. If a radio is certified, that fact should be noted in the owner's manual, and/or on the radio itself. So before buying, you can take a close look at any pictures or manuals that are available. The FCC also maintains a database, which is available at this link. As you can see, however, this database is not particularly easy to search. You do not have the option of searching by manufacturer or model number.

As noted above, these radios are for use by licensed hams. If you decide to use one of these without a license, there's a high probability that you'll eventually get caught, and eventually face a large fine. Some people think that it's a good idea to buy a radio such as one of these for use in some future "emergency". In some cases, the future emergency use is planned after "TSHTF", and it's presumed that the FCC will no longer be in business. While that is certainly possible, getting a license is still a good idea. If you're buying a radio to communicate from Point A to Point B in an emergency, it's a good idea to test the radio and see whether it can, indeed, communicate between those two points. And if you are preparing for TEOTWAWKI, then you ought to do this testing before TEOTWAWKI. And to do that, you'll need a license. Getting a license is not difficult, and there are many resources available to help you get your license. In fact, I am the author of a study guide for the beginning level of license, the Technician license. You can see the full details for my book at this link. For more thoughts on the subject, you can visit my Emergency Communications Page.

Since these radios should be used only by licensed hams, it goes without saying that they should be used only in the ham bands. If you use it outside the ham bands, then chances are, you'll be using a frequency that's assigned to someone else. If it's the local taxi company, then they'll complain to their radio supplier about the interference, and the radio supplier will eventually figure out what's going on. If it's the local police department, then this process will undoubtedly be followed by some unpleasantness down at the station. In either case, you're liable for a fine in the ballpark of $10,000 per day. With other suitable unlicensed radios available, it's just not worth the risk.


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Since most of these radios will physically transmit on frequencies used by commercial and public service users, some of those users might be tempted to purchase them. Unless the radio is certified under Part 90, this is a very bad idea. You might save a few hundred dollars by doing so, but it is illegal to use these radios for those purposes in the United States, because there is no indication that they are certified for use in those services, and they are not guaranteed to meet the technical requirements for such radios. In all likelihood, you'll get away with it for a while. But if your radio ever causes interference problems and someone investigates the source of the problem, then you could very well wind up having to pay a fine of $10,000 per day. It's not worth the risk. (If the radio is certified under Part 90, then it is probably OK to use the radio for such purposes, but that is outside the scope of this article, so do your own research.)

If you decide to buy one of these radios, let me give you one last piece of advice. Most of these radios are capable of transmitting outside the ham bands. As a ham, it's perfectly legal for you to own such a radio, but it's not legal for you to transmit outside the ham bands. On the other hand, it is perfectly legal for you to receive signals outside the ham bands. And chances are, after you buy such a radio, you'll want to program in some interesting channels outside the ham bands. When you do, it's a good idea to program the radio to transmit on a ham frequency. For example, if you want to listen to NOAA weather on 162.55 MHz, or a police department on 470 MHz, you can easily program these frequencies. But if you do nothing else, the radio will also be programmed to transmit on the same frequency. It's not unheard of to bump the push-to-talk switch by accident. Indeed, it's quite possible that the transmit button gets bumped, stays pushed, and is not noticed. So if you were listening to the local police department, you would unknowingly be transmitting on their frequency with an open mike, and every cop in town is listening to you go about your business. Eventually, they will come knocking on your door, and they won't be pleased. Therefore, you should program a transmit frequency inside the ham bands to go along with that receive frequency. So when you put the radio in your pocket and the switch gets bumped, you'll be transmitting in the ham bands. Perhaps your ham buddies will eventually come knocking on your door, but they generally won't be as upset as the local police department, and you'll avoid a trip down to the station to explain yourself.

If you're looking for an inexpensive rig for 222 MHz, please visit my 222 MHz page.

Nitro-Pak Emergency Preparedness Center

The old version of this page

The information and links above should be up to date, and most of those products should be available on Amazon. When I first started this page, most of these radios were available only from China, and I had the radios shown below linked. The radios listed below are generally no longer available from the links shown. Even though the links no longer work, I'm leaving this part of the page active, in case you're looking for information on one of these radios.

CVSB-J48-110V Chinese 70cm Handheld

Long Range Walkie Talkie Set (UHF, 110v)

I'm not quite sure what to make of this product, although it appears to be an extremely inexpensive 440 MHz handheld.

There is no indication that this unit is certified under any part of the FCC rules, so it is not suitable for any commercial use in the United States. But for something really inexpensive for occasional use by licensed amateurs, this radio appears to be somewhat useful.

It does appear to cover the entire 70 cm ham band, and it appears that you can enter frequencies from the front panel and/or program up to 199 memories.

If you're a licensed ham, then $80 seems like an extremely cheap price for a couple of 440 MHz handhelds. Even so, there are a couple of cautions:

There is no indication that these units are able to send CTCSS tones (also known as "PL" tones). Therefore, they cannot be used on most repeaters, since most 70 cm repeaters seem to use tones. But for simplex use, they're probably a very good value. If you need an extra handheld in the glove compartment, for working on antennas, etc., then these seem to fit the bill.

As noted above, these are not certified for sale in the United States. Since it is not legal to sell such radios, then you're probably on shaky legal ground if you decide to sell it later. However, it is perfectly legal for you to buy one or two for your own personal use (buying quantities under ten don't qualify as "importing"). And it is legal for you to transmit on the ham bands with them, since there is no requirement that hams use certified transmitters.

However, it is required that any transmitter you use meets the FCC spectral purity requirements. Chances are, these units do. After all, those requirements are not exactly rocket science. However, there is no guarantee, so you should take a look at your signal before using them on the air. It's always possible that they put out a spur on some out-of-band frequency. So you should look at your signal on the frequency you intend to use, and make sure the output is clean.

If you understand these limitations, then it seems to me that $80 is an excellent price for not one, but two, UHF handhelds. Of course, if you don't understand these limitations (or you're unwilling to take the risk that the output won't be clean), then you should look elsewhere. Also, please don't buy one of these as your only ham rig. You'll be sorely disappointed. But if you just need a spare UHF rig, then these cheap radios just might fit the bill.

Update: This pair of HT's is now available on Amazon, but at a somewhat higher price:

And here's a dual-band HT for $52.99, including shipping:

SinoRise SR-638UA Specialized 99-Channal Digital Walkie Talkie

And here is the "Sinorise Model SR-638", a dual-band (2 meter and 70 cm) in the same category, for $52.99, which includes shipping from China. Once again, the specs on the web site are rather limited, but it has a power output of 2.5 Watts, and covers 136-174 MHz, and 400-470 MHz. All of the cavaets above still apply, except this one appears to have CTCSS capability, since it features "155 groups of CTCSS/DCS coder".

This one doesn't appear to have a keyboard for entry of frequencies, but according to the description, it is "PC Programmable", and has a USB connector (which appears to be on the bottom).

There's one review on the website, which seems to say that the USB cable is not included, but a 120 volt charger is.

According to some feedback I received from Szilard, YO6VSR/HA6VSR. It looks like if you can get this radio cheap, it might be suitable for UHF simplex, but it has many limitations. Here's his feedback:

This is definitely a MONO band, SIMPLEX radio with CTCSS. Output is only 0,2 watt low, 1 watt high power. In the beginning I thought, that I have made a mistake and can not handle the programming software. But I realized, that the extra programming USB cable can only handle the frequency and power adjustments. The TX Shift is not allowed by hardware, so it is an expensive PMR radio. Power adjusting is possible only changing the channel above CH 16. I do not recommend it for anyone. Battery is very bad. Only the charger is OK, it has an extra socket for 2nd battery, so you can charge the radio and an other battery at one. This is the only one advantage. If someone knows, how to make the radio dual band, let me know, I am very curious.

SinoRise SR-638UA Specialized 99-Channal Digital Walkie Talkie


Here are a few more that I've found, with even lower prices, all of which include shipping:

Hongda HD-360 70 cm HT, $38

This one covers the 70 cm band, with 5 watts, and sells for $38, including shipping. It appears to have CTCSS capability. It's billed as being sixteen channels, but there's no indication from the product description as to how the frequencies are programmed.
Rechargeable 5W 400-470MHz 16-Channel Walkie-Talkie FM Transceiver (VHF/UHF) HD-360
Rechargeable 5W 400-470MHz 16-Channel Walkie-Talkie FM Transceiver (VHF/UHF) HD-360


Hongda HD-Q6 dual band HT, $49 This one covers both 2 meters and 70 cm, also with 16 channels, with about 5 watts output power. Like the HD-360, there's no obvious method of how you program the thing. There's no mention of CTCSS capability.
Dual Frequency Handheld Walkie-Talkie FM Transceiver (VHF/UHF) HD-Q6
Dual Frequency Handheld Walkie-Talkie FM Transceiver (VHF/UHF) HD-Q6


Hongda HD-8800 VHF/UHF Handheld, $67 This one is described as "VHF/UHF", but the frequency range is not specified. There's also no mention of CTCSS capability. It has 99 channels, and presumably one can program them from the keypad and LCD screen.
Professional LCD Display Walkie-Talkie FM Transceiver (VHF/UHF) HD-8800
Professional LCD Display Walkie-Talkie FM Transceiver (VHF/UHF) HD-8800


Hongda HD-K99, $54

This one covers both 2 meters and 70 cm. Again, it's a mystery as to how the sixteen channels are programmed.
HONGDA HD-K99 Two Way Radio VHF/UHF FM Transceiver
HONGDA HD-K99 Two Way Radio VHF/UHF FM Transceiver


Hongda HD-Q8 dual band HT, $48

This one's product description at least refers to a programming cable.
HONGDA HD-Q8 Two Way Radio VHF/UHF FM Transceiver
HONGDA HD-Q8 Two Way Radio VHF/UHF FM Transceiver


Hongda HD-660 dual band HT, $51 This one covers both 2 meters and 70 cm with 5 watts. Again, it's unclear how those sixteen channels are programmed.
HONGDA HD-660 Two Way Radio VHF/UHF FM Transceiver
HONGDA HD-660 Two Way Radio VHF/UHF FM Transceiver


Hongda A-88, $46
HONGDA A-88 Two Way Radio VHF/UHF FM Transceiver
HONGDA A-88 Two Way Radio VHF/UHF FM Transceiver


Hongda HD-620, $51
HONGDA Two Way Radio VHF/UHF FM Transceiver HD-620
HONGDA Two Way Radio VHF/UHF FM Transceiver HD-620


Hongda HD-668, $51
HONGDA Two Way Radio VHF/UHF FM Transceiver HD-668
HONGDA Two Way Radio VHF/UHF FM Transceiver HD-668


Shouao TS-228, $51.30
SHOUAO TS-228 UHF VHF Radio
SHOUAO TS-228 UHF VHF Radio


TYT-800, 70 cm, $48
TYT-800 VHF/UHF FM Transceiver
TYT-800 VHF/UHF FM Transceiver


BBT-789, dual band, $35.30
BBT-789 VHF/UHF FM Transceiver
BBT-789 VHF/UHF FM Transceiver


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